REVIEW: Love Supreme Revisited @ Jazz FM, 04/07/2020 – 05/07/2020

Credit: Jazz FM

The annual Love Supreme Jazz Festival goes to Jazz FM for the weekend.

This past weekend marked the seventh anniversary of the original Love Supreme Jazz Festival in 2013. Love Supreme has run throughout Sussex for the past seven years. Ciro Romano founded Love Supreme in 2013, which he named after famous jazz album ‘A Love Supreme’ by John Coltrane. The festival explores and celebrates jazz, R&B and soul music. The festival was set to happen in Glynde in East Sussex and last for three days. Unfortunately, for its eighth iteration, supposed to be happening last weekend, it was cancelled due to COVID-19 and for the safety of artists, audience members and the town of Glynde.

As a result both the Love Supreme Jazz Festival team as well as Jazz FM brought us ‘Love Supreme Revisited’ last weekend. A series of classic performances revisited for a two-day broadcast on Jazz FM. Including live recordings of performances from past years, archive interviews, exclusive lockdown sessions and a recreation of the festival’s popular opening night DJ party, featuring live sets. Across both days you could expect to hear the past performances of artists such as George Benson, Caro Emerald, Jamie Cullum, GoGo Penguin, Laura Mvula, Average White Band, Ezra Collective, Mr Jukes and many more.

So, how did Love Supreme Revisited go?

The DJ’s at Jazz FM were great at creating immersion in combination with the music. They made the listener feel closer to the experience of going to the festival. For someone who has never been, the depictions of the huge stages and fields filled with tents made me all the more intrigued and engaged for the duration of the broadcasts. My favourite archive performance over the two days was one from 2018 by the James Taylor Quartet, which began at around 7pm on Saturday 4th. Their performance once again arose this immersion as they interacted with audience members, encouraging the crowd to sing between and during songs. As a listener, I felt encompassed and within the atmosphere rather than beside it.

‘Cherokee Louise’ was a stand out cover song from Alicia Olatuja, which had great emotional storytelling capability. Ezra Collective had great energy with their performance of ‘The Philosopher’. GoGo Penguin’s 2015 ‘Fanfares’, was an enticing, fast paced piece which shifted between high and low notes and contained some amazing piano. Charity songs were also played. I particularly liked Harry Connick Jr.’s ‘Stars Still Shine’, dedicated to key workers. This felt all the more fitting due to the circumstances of the festival’s cancellation this year. Alongside the archive performances, it felt like a necessary addition.

What can we expect for the future of the Love Supreme Jazz Festival?

Between 2nd – 4th July 2021, Love Supreme will be back on the physical stage. It will showcase acts such as TLC, The Isley Brothers, Sister Sledge, Candi Station, The Brand New Heavies and Tom Misch & Yussef Dayes. Tickets are also on sale now! All in all, Love Supreme Revisited was an enjoyable weekend with a showcase of electric archive performances from previous years. I’m sure despite its cancellation this year, it will come back with double the energy for 2021. I for one, am looking forward to it.


You can listen to Jazz FM here:  https://planetradio.co.uk/jazz-fm/

Next year’s (2021) Love Supreme line up is also available: https://lovesupremefestival.com/lineup

Adam Zak Hawley

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